How did Jackson justify Indian Removal?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

What justification does Jackson cite for the government policy toward removal of Indian tribes from their traditional lands?

Jackson believed, “It [speedy removal] will place a dense and civilized population in large tracts of country now occupied by a few savage hunters.” Desires to remove American Indians from valuable farmland motivated state and federal governments to cease trying to assimilate Indians and instead plan for forced removal …

What was the justification behind the Indian Removal Act of 1830?

The Indian Removal Act was passed on May 26, 1830. The president at the time was Andrew Jackson. The Indian Removal Act allowed Jackson to make deals with the Native Americans to get them to move west. In exchange for giving up their land, Indians were promised food, supplies, and money.

What did not occur as a result of the Indian Removal Act?

Which did not occur as a result of the Indian Removal Act? … The Cherokee struggled to support themselves in Indian Territory. Many American Indians rejected the federal government’s policy of assimilation because they. NOT were not interested in following a nomadic way of life.

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What were some of the effects of the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was signed into effect by President Jackson, which allowed Native Americans to settle in land within state borders in exchange for unsettled land west of the Mississippi. Many Native American tribes reacted peacefully, but many reacted violently.

Did the Indian Removal Act violate the Constitution?

In 1828, Jackson was elected president. … Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress. Members of Congress like Davy Crockett argued that Jackson violated the Constitution by refusing to enforce treaties that guaranteed Indian land rights. But Congress passed the removal law in the spring of 1830.

How long did the Indian Removal Act last?

Milestones: 1830–1860.

Why is the Indian Removal Act important?

It gave the president power to negotiate removal treaties with Indian tribes living east of the Mississippi. Under these treaties, the Indians were to give up their lands east of the Mississippi in exchange for lands to the west. Those wishing to remain in the east would become citizens of their home state.

How did the two tribes attempt to resist the Indian Removal Act?

In a nutshell: the Choctaw were the first to sign a treaty of removal but some tribal members resisted by staying behind under treaty provisions; the Cherokee used legal means to resist removal; the Seminole who considered the treaty of removal illegitimate fought two wars of resistance; the Creek refused to leave …

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